CURRENT HEADLINES



New Study Offers Clues To Swift Arctic Extinction


A study seems to rule out assimilation as the reason for the sudden disappearance of the Paleo-Eskimo population that thrived alone for more than 4,000 years.

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-28:20:6:3




Genetic clues to spread of Ebola


Scientists have tracked the spread of Ebola in West Africa, revealing genetic clues to the course of the outbreak.

From the BBC News-2014-8-28:20:6:2




DNA tells story of Arctic peopling


A study of genetic sequences sheds light on the settling of the North American Arctic, from ancient "Paleo-Eskimos" to the modern-day Inuit.

From the BBC News-2014-8-28:20:6:1




Matter: Parasites Practicing Mind Control


A new study suggests that Toxoplasma can turn its host's genes on and off, influencing behavior.

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-28:14:6:1




Global coal 'binge' missed in data


The climate impacts of the world's fossil-fuelled power plants are being underestimated because of poor accounting, say researchers.

From the BBC News-2014-8-26:20:6:1




Judge Blocks a Local Pesticide Law in Hawaii


The local law, which concerned the use of pesticides and genetically modified crops on the island of Kauai, was disallowed.

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-26:8:5:2




VIDEO: Rare duck needs new home


The world's rarest bird is facing extinction unless it finds a new home, say conservationists

From the BBC News-2014-8-26:8:5:1




Looking at Twin Personality Through Look-alikes


When twins have similar personalities, is it mainly because they share so much genetic material or because their physical resemblance makes other people treat them alike?

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-25:20:6:1




Darwin's barnacles found in Denmark


A gift from the world-famous naturalist is to go on display in Copenhagen.

From the BBC News-2014-8-22:14:6:1




VIDEO: New dates rewrite Neanderthal story


The history of human evolution has been completely rewritten with the discovery that modern human beings and Neanderthals coexisted in Europe for much longer than previously thought.

From the BBC News-2014-8-21:8:5:1




New dates rewrite Neanderthal story


A new study suggests that modern humans and Neanderthals co-existed in Europe 10 times longer than previously thought.

From the BBC News-2014-8-20:14:6:1




Neanderthals in Europe Died Out Thousands of Years Sooner Than Some Thought, Study Says


The finding, aided by advances in radiocarbon dating, sharply narrows the period that Neanderthals and modern humans overlapped in Europe.

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-20:14:6:2




Maths helps find climate-proof crops


Researchers are developing mathematical models to help identify genetic material that could improve food crops' resilience to climate change.

From the BBC News-2014-8-16:8:5:1




Giant Amazon fish 'locally extinct'


A 10 foot long fish which used to dominate the Amazon river has been fished to extinction in a number of areas, a new study shows.

From the BBC News-2014-8-13:14:6:1




GM flies 'could save crops'


A type of genetically engineered fly which eventually kills itself off can be an effective method of pest control, according to new research.

From the BBC News-2014-8-13:8:5:1




Smallest insect genome sequenced


The Antarctic midge has the smallest insect genome sequenced to date, scientists discover.

From the BBC News-2014-8-12:14:6:1




Mind: Gene Strategy to Fight Alzheimer's Clears a Hurdle


Research suggests that reducing or neutralizing one variety of the APOE gene would not harm the brain, while making Alzheimer's less likely.

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-11:20:6:1




Basics: African Wild Dogs, True Best Friends


Notwithstanding their name, African wild dogs are "true altruists," researchers say, essentially willing to sacrifice their lives for the pack, and are slowly coming back from near extinction.

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-11:20:6:2




Geneticists Respond


More than a hundred population genetics and human evolution researchers sign a letter in the New YorkTimes saying a recent book misrepresents their field.

From Genomeweb News News-2014-8-11:17:15:1




AUDIO: Scientists hail dinosaur discovery


Scientists from the University of Zurich and The Natural History museum have discovered a previously unknown species of dinosaur.

From the BBC News-2014-8-6:8:5:1




Stem cell scientist found dead


A Japanese scientist involved in a scandal over discredited stem cell research has been found dead in an apparent suicide.

From the BBC News-2014-8-5:20:6:1




DNA fingerprinting pioneer honoured


Prof Sir Alec Jeffreys, who invented genetic fingerprinting in 1984, receives the world's oldest science prize, the Royal Society's Copley Medal.

From the BBC News-2014-8-5:8:5:1




Essay: In Darwin's Footsteps


The biologists Peter and Rosemary Grant have spent four decades tracking finches on the cone of an extinct volcano and augmenting our understanding of evolution.

From the NYTimes News-2014-8-4:20:6:1




Matter: Having More Than One Set of DNA Carries Legacy of Risk


Mosaicism is more common than once thought and can lead to diseases in the children of those with more than one genome, a study says.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-31:20:6:1




Observatory: Seals Surviving Climate Change Tend to Thrive


Antarctic fur seal populations are declining, and changing genetically.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-28:20:6:1




Dinosaurs' extinction 'bad luck'


Dinosaurs might have survived if the asteroid that wiped them out had hit the Earth a few million years later or earlier, a new study suggests.

From the BBC News-2014-7-28:8:5:1




In Search for Killer, DNA Sweep Exposes Intimate Family Secrets in Italy


The search for the killer in a sensational murder case revealed personal details about a suspect and set off a debate about the risks of privacy violations in DNA searches.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-27:8:5:1




'Fluffy' dinosaurs were widespread


A discovery of 150 million year old fossils in Siberia indicates that feathers were much more widespread among dinosaurs than previously thought.

From the BBC News-2014-7-25:8:5:1




Matter: Study Gives Hope of Adaptation to Climate Change


Research on flies in drier conditions indicates that some have the genes to survive longer over generations.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-24:14:6:1




Genetic clues to age of first period


The timing of when a girl reaches puberty is controlled by hundreds of genes, say scientists.

From the BBC News-2014-7-24:8:5:1




Two rare Amur leopards born at zoo


A pair of Amur leopards, which zookeepers say are on the brink of extinction, are born at Leicestershire's Twycross Zoo.

From the BBC News-2014-7-23:8:5:1




Observatory: The Gene That Turns Worms Into Pavlov's Dogs


Japanese scientists working with roundworms found that those with a genetic defect in a specific insulin receptor did not learn to avoid unpleasant situations the way other worms did.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-21:20:6:1




Matter: A Call to Fight Malaria One Mosquito at a Time by Altering DNA


Two papers published Thursday say the procedure, known as Crispr, can have wide benefits. But other experts worry about unintended consequences.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-17:20:6:1




Gene Therapy Used to Create 'Biological Pacemaker' in Pigs


The technique, in which a gene is injected into the heart to reprogram cells, may one day be an alternative to electronic pacemakers, researchers say.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-16:20:6:1




Four-winged dinosaur found in China


The largest ever four-winged dinosaur has been discovered in China, with remarkably long feathers on its hindwings and tail.

From the BBC News-2014-7-16:8:5:1




Do friends have similar genomes?


A study from US researchers suggests that friends are more genetically similar than strangers - to the same degree as fourth cousins.

From the BBC News-2014-7-15:8:5:1




After the Fact: Bigfoot and Yeti, as Elusive as Ever


Genetic testing of 30 samples of hair supposedly from a humanoid creature determined they were from other known animals, though two were from an extinct species.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-14:20:6:2




Observatory: A 52-Million-Year-Old Window Into the Future


A fossil, only two inches long, discovered in British Columbia is determined to be of a hedgehog that lived 52 million years ago, during the early Eocene epoch.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-14:20:6:1




Same genes 'drive maths and reading'


Around half of the genes that influence a child's reading ability also play a role in how easily they learn maths, say scientists.

From the BBC News-2014-7-10:8:5:1




Observatory: Ancient Bird Had Some Feathers Just for Show


A new fossil of a well-known early bird could help shed light on the evolution of feathers, researchers say.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-7:20:6:2




Giant bird's fossil identified


The fossilised remains of the largest flying bird ever found are identified by scientists.

From the BBC News-2014-7-7:20:6:1




Early bird 'had feather trousers'


Fossil reveals early bird's feathered "trousers"

From the BBC News-2014-7-3:8:5:1




Altitude gene 'from extinct species'


A gene that allows present-day people cope with life at high altitude was inherited from an extinct species of human, Nature journal has reported.

From the BBC News-2014-7-2:14:6:1




After Controversy, Stem Cell Research Papers Are Retracted


The journal Nature said the papers - which detailed an easy way to create stem cells - were error-filled and had not been verified by anyone else.

From the NYTimes News-2014-7-2:14:6:2




Ash Forests After Emerald Ash Borers Destroy Them


The emerald ash borer is devastating trees from Minnesota to New York, and there is little scientists can do but study what effect the trees' extinction will have on the ecosystem.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-30:20:6:1




The Brave New World of Three-Parent I.V.F.


A new treatment could sidestep certain hereditary diseases by altering the genetic makeup of the egg. Is there anything wrong with that?

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-30:14:6:2




Oldest faeces show Neanderthal diet


Analysis of a 50,000-year-old scrap of human faeces adds weight to the view that Neanderthals ate plants as well as meat.

From the BBC News-2014-6-30:14:6:1




A Conversation With Svante Paabo: Searching for Answers in Very Old DNA


The geneticist Svante Paabo created his own research field by sequencing the genomes of ancient humans.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-25:20:11:1




Computing Crime and Punishment


A trove of London trial data over more than two centuries, digitized and analyzed by algorithm, yield clues in the evolution of the British justice system.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-16:20:6:1




Observatory: Pterosaurs, Flying Reptiles, Were a Social Lot


The discovery of intact eggs and pterosaur fossils in China suggests that the creatures nested in large groups.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-16:20:6:2




Global Health: A Faster Way to Find the Origin of Malaria


A DNA "bar code" of 23 snips from the genes of parasites that cause malaria can help scientists quickly determine where they originated, British researchers report.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-16:20:6:3




Matter: A Long-Ago Ancestor: A Little Fish, With Jaws to Come


Metaspriggina is two inches long and 505 million years old, and scientists recently uncovered an extraordinary cache of its fossils.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-11:20:6:1




Future Fossils: Plastic Stone


Relics fused from natural and artificial substances could one day be markers of humanity.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-9:20:6:1




Human remains found inside crocodile


Australian police are examining human remains recovered from a crocodile to see if they match the DNA of a missing man.

From the BBC News-2014-6-9:8:5:1




N.I.H. Seeks $4.5 Billion to Try to Crack the Code of How Brains Function


The National Institutes of Health's price tag stamps President Obama's Brain Initiative as an effort on the scale of the Human Genome Project.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-6:8:5:2




George J. Armelagos, Anthropologist Who Told Skeletons' Tales, Dies at 77


Professor Armelagos was one of the founders of paleopathology, a discipline at the nexus of biology, medicine, evolution, archaeology and culture.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-6:8:5:1




UN urges action on forest diversity


Vital forest genetic resources are coming under increasing pressure from human activities and climate change and face the risk of extinction, the UN warns.

From the BBC News-2014-6-5:20:6:1




DNA Test Indicates Camel-to-Human Transmission of MERS


The virus in a 44-year-old Saudi man who died in November was the same as that in an ailing camel he was tending, scientists report.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-5:14:6:1




In First, Quick DNA Test Diagnoses a Boy's Illness


Researchers report sequencing DNA to identify an elusive pathogen within 48 hours, but experts say it will be years before widespread use of the method.

From the NYTimes News-2014-6-4:20:6:1




A genome for the blind mole rat


Scientists have sequenced the genome of the blind mole rat, a mammal that digs with its teeth, lives for 20 years and has never naturally developed cancer

From the BBC News-2014-6-4:14:6:1




VIDEO: Looking for the faces of our ancestors


Today we can all look online to find out who our ancestors were, and soon geneticists hope that DNA can show us their faces as well.

From the BBC News-2014-6-3:8:5:1




Smoking and cancer gene 'deadly mix'


Smoking and the breast cancer risk gene BRCA2 combine to "enormously" increase the risk of lung cancer, a UK-based study shows.

From the BBC News-2014-6-2:14:6:1




Crickets muted by evolution, twice


To help them hide from deadly flies, male crickets on two Hawaiian islands have separately evolved an inability to sing, biologists report.

From the BBC News-2014-5-29:14:6:1




Largest fossilised croc tooth found


The fossilised tooth of a prehistoric crocodile is recorded as the largest of its kind found in the UK.

From the BBC News-2014-5-29:8:5:1




Gene test for heart risk rolled out


A blood test for a preventable form of heart disease, caused by inherited high cholesterol levels, is being rolled out in the UK.

From the BBC News-2014-5-28:14:6:1




Craft Beer, at the Genetic Level


While brewing yeast is one of the best-studied organisms in molecular and cell biology, exactly how its genes translate to varied beers is still poorly understood.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-26:14:6:1




Raw Data: A Creationist's Influence on Darwin


Decades before "On the Origin of Species," a theologian proposed - and rejected - a version of natural selection, and Darwin read about it in college.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-23:20:6:1




Matter: A Theory on How Flightless Birds Spread Across the World: They Flew There


DNA analysis in a new study suggests that the common ancestor of ratites continued to fly even after the supercontinent Gondwana split into pieces.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-22:20:6:2




Flies take time over tough decisions


A study shows that fruit flies take extra time over difficult decisions and a set of 200 neurons, marked out by a particular gene, may be crucial.

From the BBC News-2014-5-22:20:6:1




X-rays shine light on mystery 'bird'


A new 3D fossil-scanning technique inspired by Leonardo Da Vinci's camera obscura has produced the clearest images yet of Archaeopteryx, "the first bird".

From the BBC News-2014-5-22:14:6:1




VIDEO: Scans unlock secrets of 'first bird'


A new 3D X-ray fossil-scanning technique has produced the clearest images yet of Archaeopteryx, often described as "the first bird".

From the BBC News-2014-5-22:8:5:1




Christian College Faces Uproar After Bolstering Its View on Evolution


Bryan College now says Adam and Eve "are historical persons created by God in a special formative act, and not from previously existing life-forms."

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-20:20:6:1




Raw Data: Creation, in the Eye of the Beholder


For some of us, the apparent perfect symmetry of nature suggests an inventor. But evolution is messier and more roughshod than our own machines.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-19:20:6:1




Retro Report: DNA Analysis Exposes an Inexact Forensic Science


Instances of wrongful imprisonment have made clear that microscopic hair analysis, a staple of forensics for years, was not as flawless as people had been led to believe.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-19:8:5:1




VIDEO: 'Biggest dinosaur ever' discovered


Fossilised bones of dinosaur believed to be the largest creature ever to walk the Earth has been unearthed in Argentina, palaeontologists say.

From the BBC News-2014-5-17:14:6:1




Next Week on Retro Report


Before DNA testing, prosecutors often relied on microscopic hair analysis to put criminals behind bars. But how reliable was it? Visit nytimes.com on Monday for the full story.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-17:8:5:2




'Biggest dinosaur ever' discovered


A new species of titanosaur unearthed in Argentina is the largest animal ever to walk the Earth, palaeontologists say.

From the BBC News-2014-5-17:8:5:1




Prehistoric Skeleton in Mexico Is Said to Link Modern Native Americans to Siberians


DNA in the bones of a teenage girl in an underwater cave in the Yucatán show that she has an Asian-derived genetic lineage, researchers say.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-15:20:6:1




1,000 crayfish released into river


More than 1,000 native white-clawed captive reared crayfish are released into a river in Powys in a bid to "save the species from extinction".

From the BBC News-2014-5-9:8:5:1




Matter: Antibiotic-Resistant Germs, Lying in Wait Everywhere


A study finds that genes that let bacteria survive drugs intended to wipe them out are widespread, even in the most isolated parts of the planet.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-8:14:6:2




Lab bug extends 'life's alphabet'


Scientists produce a semi-synthetic version of a bacterium that has an extended genetic code.

From the BBC News-2014-5-8:14:6:1




Researchers Report Breakthrough in Creating Artificial Genetic Code


The accomplishment might eventually lead to organisms that make medicines or industrial products that cannot be made by cells with only natural DNA.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-7:14:6:2




Universe evolution recreated in lab


An international team of researchers has created the most complete visual simulation yet of how our Universe evolved.

From the BBC News-2014-5-7:14:6:1




French action plan for wild hamster


Authorities in Alsace, France, are spending three million euros to help a type of wild hamster facing extinction.

From the BBC News-2014-5-7:8:5:1




At Chernobyl, Hints of Nature's Adaption


A long-term study of the Chernobyl fallout area has found that some bird species have adapted to the radioactive environment by producing more protective antioxidants, with correspondingly less genetic damage.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-5:20:6:1




Out There: Cosmic Connections in the Deep Sea


The sea is its own cosmos, and whatever meaning we can ascribe to the universe arose in its depths, the mysterious caldron of creativity and possibility, the restless sifting of chance, adaptation, survival and extinction.

From the NYTimes News-2014-5-5:20:6:2




VIDEO: Trace back your DNA 1,000 years


A scientist claims he has a found a way of tracing where our DNA was formed, over 1000 years ago.

From the BBC News-2014-5-1:20:6:1




Pre-pregnancy diet 'affects genes'


A mother's diet can permanently alter the functioning of her child's genes, even before conception, say scientists.

From the BBC News-2014-4-30:8:5:1




Retro Report: Three Mile Island, and Nuclear Hopes and Fears


The disaster at a Pennsylvania plant fueled misgivings about nuclear power, as have those at Chernobyl and Fukushima. But the fossil-fuel alternative still holds great allure.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-29:8:5:1




From Volunteers, a DNA Database


The Personal Genome Project is gradually working its way toward 100,000 volunteers who are willing to have their genetic data in the public domain.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-28:20:6:1




The Continuing Evolution of Genes


Scientists have found that genes are still to emerging. Now they're trying to see why some quickly take on essential tasks, and others fall to the wayside.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-28:20:6:2




DNA fingerprint for legendary tree


Scientists produce a DNA "fingerprint" for a tree descended from one under which the Greek father of medicine taught his students.

From the BBC News-2014-4-28:14:6:1




The strange case of the 'time travel' murder


Strange London case helped to advance use of DNA evidence

From the BBC News-2014-4-28:8:5:1




Douglas L. Coleman, 82, Dies; Found a Genetic Cause of Obesity


Dr. Coleman upset scientific dogma by discovering that genes - not willpower, eating habits or other behaviors - could cause obesity in some people.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-26:8:5:1




New Tool to Fight Deadly Tsetse Fly


Sequencing the genome of one tsetse species took a decade, partly because tsetses have unusual biology and partly because of global health politics.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-24:20:6:1




Vermont Will Require Labeling of Genetically Altered Foods


Vermont's approval was hailed by food-safety advocates. Meanwhile, the biotech industry has drafted federal legislation to pre-empt any such state initiatives.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-24:8:5:2




Researchers See New Importance in Y Chromosome


Two surveys have reconstructed the full history of the shrunken male chromosome, which provides regulatory genes that play a role throughout the body.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-24:8:5:1




Researchers See New Importance for Y Chromosome


Two surveys have reconstructed the full history of the shrunken male chromosome, which provides regulatory genes that play a role throughout the body.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-23:14:6:1




The Map Makers: Mind Control in a Flash of Light


Karl Deisseroth is among a group of scientists who have been working on a way to turn brain cells on and off using genetic engineering and light.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-21:14:6:1




Scientists Report Advance in 'Therapeutic Cloning'


Scientists have moved a step closer to the goal of creating stem cells perfectly matched to a patient's DNA in order to treat diseases, they announced on Thursday, creating patient-specific cell lines out of the skin cells of two adult men.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-18:8:5:1




Matter: Plants That Practice Genetic Engineering


Long ago, a new paper suggests, a fern took a useful gene from a neighboring hornwort, an acquisition that allowed ferns to thrive in shade.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-17:14:6:1




Beard trend 'guided by evolution'


The boom and bust of men's beard fashions may mirror Darwinian selection, scientists say.

From the BBC News-2014-4-16:8:5:1




How to move a T-Rex dinosaur


Moving a dinosaur skeleton across the US

From the BBC News-2014-4-15:8:5:2




VIDEO: How to prep dinosaur remains for a 2,000 mile road trip


How to prep dinosaur remains for a 2,000 mile road trip

From the BBC News-2014-4-15:8:5:1




European Union Debates Initiative on Embryo Protection


A hearing was held on a petition bearing 1.8 million signatures that would ban the use of European funds for activities such as stem-cell research.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-10:20:6:1




Exhibition Review: Natural History Museum Explores the Wonders of Pterosaurs


"Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of the Dinosaurs," an exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History, prompts reflection on the unpredictable nature of evolution.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-10:14:6:1




Phys Ed: Are You Programmed to Enjoy Exercise?


According to an eye-opening new genetics study of lab rats, the motivation to exercise - or not - may be at least partly inherited.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-9:14:6:1




AUDIO: Britain's first cloned dog is born


Britain's first cloned dog has been born after her owner won a competition offering the procedure for free.

From the BBC News-2014-4-9:8:5:1




For Space Projects, Zero Gravity


The Mars rover Opportunity, still operating after 10 years on the planet, and the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn are among the NASA missions facing budget extinction.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-7:20:6:3




A Conversation With: What Fish Teach Us About Us


Neil H. Shubin, the paleontologist who helped discover a fossil hailed as a missing link between sea and land animals, talks about his television series, "Your Inner Fish," and why he teaches anatomy classes.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-7:20:6:1




Fearing Punishment for Bad Genes


Many people at risk of serious inherited diseases would like to know if they carry the genes, yet fear a positive result could be used against them.

From the NYTimes News-2014-4-7:20:6:2




The origin of lions discovered


A new genetic analysis confirms where modern lions came from, scientists say.

From the BBC News-2014-4-2:8:5:1




Observatory: In Extra Rib, a Harbinger of Mammoth's Doom


The superfluous bone, seen in fossil samples, was a sign of inbreeding and harsh conditions during pregnancy.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-31:20:6:1




Synthetic DNA advance is hailed


Scientists have created the first synthetic chromosome for yeast in a landmark achievement for biological engineering.

From the BBC News-2014-3-27:20:6:1




Matter: Enlisting a Computer to Battle Cancers, One by One


Once you decode a tumor's genome, what's next? Oncologists hope that IBM's Watson will help them find drugs for patients' particular brain cancer mix.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-27:8:5:1




VIDEO: 'A deep misunderstanding of genetics'


Prof Steve Jones says Boris Johnson shows a "deep misunderstanding of genetics" when he talks about cornflakes.

From the BBC News-2014-3-26:14:6:1




Well: The Dreaded Turning-50 Test


Despite new evidence that colonoscopy is reducing cancer rates, the yuck factor is still high. A new alternative may be a DNA stool test.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-25:14:6:1




Monster turtle fossils re-united


Two halves of a fossil bone found more 160 years apart finally allow scientists to scale one of the biggest sea turtles that ever lived.

From the BBC News-2014-3-25:8:5:1




Observatory: No Monkeying Around for These Partners


Genetic analysis supports what observation had already suggested about the steadfast monogamy of Azara's owl monkeys in South American.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-24:20:6:2




After the Fact: Bird's Extinction Is Tied to the Arrival of Humans


Scientists have long assumed that humans played a role in the moa's obliteration. Now there's inescapable proof.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-24:20:6:1




AUDIO: Scientists find chicken-like dinosaur


US scientists have discovered a new species of dinosaur, nicknamed the 'Chicken from Hell.'

From the BBC News-2014-3-20:14:6:1




'Chicken from hell' dinosaur discovery


US scientists announce the discovery of a new species of dinosaur, which offers further clues to how the great beast became extinct 66 million years ago.

From the BBC News-2014-3-19:20:6:1




Raw Data: A Tumor, the Embryo's Evil Twin


Scientists have been finding that the same genes that guide fetal cells as they multiply, migrate and create a newborn child are also among the primary drivers of cancer.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-17:20:6:2




Scientist in the News: Shoukhrat Mitalipov's Mitochrondrial Manipulations


A scientist's procedures have shaken up the field of genetics, bringing promise to would-be parents while drawing the ire of bioethicists and the scrutiny of regulators.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-17:20:6:1




UK scientists call for new GM trials


There should be more UK field trials and fewer EU restrictions on genetically modified (GM) crops, a report commissioned by the prime minister says.

From the BBC News-2014-3-14:8:5:1




Skull fragments reveal new crocodile


Two fossilised fragments from a crocodile skull found on the Isle of Wight indicate the discovery of a new species, researchers say.

From the BBC News-2014-3-11:8:5:1




Campaign to help save juniper plants


A campaign is launched to help track juniper numbers across Scotland as figures show the plant could be nearing extinction.

From the BBC News-2014-3-10:14:6:1




Alejandro Zaffaroni, Biotech Entrepreneur, Dies at 91


The Uruguayan-born biochemist started more than a dozen companies and had a role in the development of the birth control pill, the nicotine patch and the DNA chip.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-7:8:5:1




A Genetic Entrepreneur Sets His Sights on Aging and Death


J. Craig Venter says his new company, Human Longevity, will focus on figuring out how people can live longer and healthier lives and will be the world's largest human DNA sequencing operation.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-6:14:6:1




Study Gives Hope of Altering Genes to Repel H.I.V.


A pilot study involving 12 people found that immune cells could be "edited" safely and that doing so sometimes helped fight infection.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-5:20:6:1




In Pursuit of Longevity, a Plan to Harness DNA Sequencing


The wealthy entrepreneur J. Craig Venter is starting a new company focusing on how people can live longer and healthier lives.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-4:14:6:1




Observatory: A Verdict of Murder


With the help of DNA analysis and a body scan of a mummy, scientists say that they have determined the cause of death of an Inca woman who lived centuries ago.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-3:20:6:2




A Powerful New Way to Edit DNA


A technique is stirring excitement while raising profound questions.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-3:20:6:1




Rare Mutation Kills Off Gene Responsible For Diabetes


Pfizer and Amgen teamed to develop drugs to mimic the effect, though it may take a decade or more before it is available to the public.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-2:20:6:1




Korean Scientist's New Project: Rebuild After Cloning Disgrace


Nearly a decade after his downfall for faking research, the South Korean scientist Hwang Woo-suk has won patents for his work in an attempt to resume studying human stem cells.

From the NYTimes News-2014-3-1:8:5:1




Dot Earth Blog: Feelings, Facts, Food and Genetic Engineering – A Fresh Look


A chef, a law professor, a scientist and two journalists discuss the role of genetic technology in our food system.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-26:14:6:1




Stunning whale graveyard explained


Scientists think they can now explain the astonishing discovery of a graveyard of fossil whales in Chile that accumulated more than five million years ago.

From the BBC News-2014-2-26:8:5:1




Last Neanderthal home is studied


An ice age site said to be one of the last known places Neanderthals lived is being studied to assess storm damage.

From the BBC News-2014-2-25:8:5:1




The Week: Clues to a Very Old Extinction and Why Calicos Look That Way


Science and health news from the past week, including a mass extinction 252 million years ago, vaccines and pizzas that don't spoil and clues to a cat's signature coat.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-24:20:6:1




A Forensic Approach to a Sidewalk Nuisance


Although some officials were not amused, many Neapolitans welcomed a new campaign to track down owners who do not pick up after their dogs by using the animals' DNA samples.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-23:14:6:1




Tourism hope for threatened lemurs


The world's most threatened primate could be saved from extinction by eco-tourism according to conservationists.

From the BBC News-2014-2-21:14:6:1




A Geologist Investigates a Mass Extinction at the End of the Permian Period


An M.I.T. geologist wants to understand how an estimated 96 percent of all species on Earth became extinct at the end of the Permian Period 252 million years ago.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-20:14:6:1




The Week: King Richard III's Eyes, and the Munchies


Scientists in England are trying to sequence a long-dead monarch's genome, and European researchers find more evidence that marijuana increases the appetite.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-17:20:6:1




GM potatoes defeat 'biggest threat'


British scientists have developed genetically modified potatoes that are resistant to the vegetable's biggest threat - blight.

From the BBC News-2014-2-16:20:6:1




Disgraced Scientist Granted U.S. Patent for Work Found to be Fraudulent


Dr. Hwang Woo-suk of South Korea received the patent for the method by which he claimed in 2004 to have extracted stem cells from cloned human embryos.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-15:8:5:1




Scientists Hope to Sequence Genome of Richard III


About a year and a half after finding the king's corpse, British researchers will grind up his bones in hopes of discovering, for example, what bacteria he might have been hosting.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-14:14:6:1




Tracing Ancestry, Team Produces Genetic Atlas of Human Mixing Events


Geneticists using new statistical approaches have taken a first shot at both identifying and dating the major population mixture events of the past 4,000 years.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-13:20:6:1




Ancient American's genome mapped


Present-day Native Americans are descended from some of the continent's earliest settlers, a genetic study suggests.

From the BBC News-2014-2-13:14:6:1




Ancient reptile's birth fossilised


A rare fossil reveals how marine reptiles evolved to give birth to live young, say scientists.

From the BBC News-2014-2-13:8:5:1




Scientists to Try to Sequence Richard III's Genetic Code


About a year and a half after finding the king's corpse, British researchers will grind up his bones in hopes of discovering his hair and eye color and what bacteria he might have been hosting.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-12:20:6:1




Modified Corn a Step Closer to Approval in Europe


If, as expected, the engineered corn gets a go-ahead for cultivation, genetic modification will remain a sensitive issue for Europe and the United States during trade talks.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-12:8:5:1




EU defies opposition to GM maize


The EU is set to approve a new type of genetically modified maize for cultivation despite huge opposition.

From the BBC News-2014-2-11:14:6:1




Australia GM crops row goes to court


An Australian farmer is suing after his farm was allegedly contaminated by genetically modified crops blown over from his neighbour's farm.

From the BBC News-2014-2-11:8:5:1




A Conversation With: 'The Sixth Extinction' Looks at Human Impact on the Environment


In "The Sixth Extinction: An Unnatural History," the New Yorker writer Elizabeth Kolbert asks science-based questions about whether humans might be causing mass extinction.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-10:20:6:2




The Week: Debating Evolution and Dealing With Climate Change


Recent developments in health and science news. This week: A deadly bird flu in China causes alarm and researchers suggest revising guideline on intervention during labor.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-10:20:6:3




The Archaeology of the Stars


Stellar archaeologists have found some very old stars, hidden in space like a pharoah's tomb and holding secrets of the cosmos' chemical evolution.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-10:20:6:1




Television Review: In 'Questioning Darwin,' No Easy Answers


The HBO documentary "Questioning Darwin," features the views of those who reject Charles Darwin's theory of evolution while chronicling Darwin's own personal trials.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-10:8:5:1




Novelties: The Path to Reading a Newborn's DNA Map


As technology becomes more sophisticated, genomic sequencing will inevitably expand into the world of newborns. The process has both medical and ethical implications.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-9:8:5:1




W. Ford Doolittle wins Herzberg gold medal for work inmolecular genetics


For his major contributions to molecular genetics,including the study of lateral gene transfer, a key driver of microbial evolution.

From The Globe and Mail News-2014-2-7:10:37:1




Matter: A Catalog of Cancer Genes That's Done, or Just a Start


As the Cancer Genome Atlas project, started in 2005, comes to an end, scientists are debating where cancer research should go next.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-6:20:6:1




'Animal Pompeii' wiped out creatures


Scientists believe fossil beds in northern China are packed with the victims of a volcanic explosion much like that that hit the Roman City of Pompeii.

From the BBC News-2014-2-5:8:5:2




Speedy cyclists are better looking


Top performers in the Tour de France were considered better looking in an experiment that shows the power of evolution, say scientists.

From the BBC News-2014-2-5:8:5:1




Books of The Times: 'The Sixth Extinction,' on Endangered and Departed Species


Elizabeth Kolbert uses a rare rhino and crow and the stories of other endangered or already vanished species to illustrate the fallout of mankind's transformation of the ecological landscape.

From the NYTimes News-2014-2-3:8:5:1




Kercher trial: How does DNA contamination occur?


The Kercher trial highlights concerns over DNA

From the BBC News-2014-1-31:8:5:1




Matter: The Little Bit of Neanderthal in All of Us


Two studies show how the legacy of Neanderthals endures 30,000 years after their extinction, finding Neanderthal genes in skin and hair that may have helped humans evolve.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-29:20:6:1




Neanderthals gave us disease genes


Genes that cause disease in people today were picked up through interbreeding with Neanderthals, a major study suggests.

From the BBC News-2014-1-29:14:6:1




AUDIO: Research 'changing cancer treatment'


The BBC's Tom Feilden and Cancer Research UK's Peter Johnson discuss The Institute of Cancer Research's new Centre for Evolution and Cancer.

From the BBC News-2014-1-28:14:6:1




Genetic Weapon Against Insects Raises Hope and Fear in Farming


Scientists, looking for new weapons against insect pests in farming, have developed gene-silencing agents. But skeptics are concerned about potential threats to nontarget insects and even humans.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-28:8:5:1




Looks of early European revealed


Genetic tests reveal that a hunter-gatherer who lived 7,000 years ago had the unusual combination of dark skin and hair and blue eyes.

From the BBC News-2014-1-27:8:5:1




GM purple tomatoes heading for shops


The prospect of genetically-modified purple tomatoes reaching the shelves has come a step closer, with large-scale production under way.

From the BBC News-2014-1-24:20:6:1




VIDEO: Purple tomatoes: Food of the future?


Scientists in Norwich have developed a genetically modified purple tomato, which is being produced in Canada due to European hostility to GM foods.

From the BBC News-2014-1-24:20:6:2




VIDEO: Storms spark coastal fossil frenzy


There has been a sharp increase in the number of amateur fossil hunters in Dorset after storms eroded parts of the Jurassic coastline.

From the BBC News-2014-1-24:14:7:1




'Fish oil' GM plant bid submitted


Field trials of a genetically modified crop containing Omega-3 fatty acids normally found in oily fish could begin in the UK this year, after a field trial application is submitted.

From the BBC News-2014-1-24:8:5:2




Genetic clue to how limbs evolved


A new study sheds light on how fish evolved into the earliest land animals millions of years ago.

From the BBC News-2014-1-24:8:5:1




AUDIO: Gin firm in bid to save juniper


A gin-making firm offers grants to those willing to help protect Britain's juniper plants from extinction.

From the BBC News-2014-1-22:14:6:1




Seeing X Chromosomes in a New Light


Scientists have enlisted color coding in the effort to better understand X chromosomes, how they are shut down in certain cells and what it all means for men and women.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-20:20:6:1




Sam Berns, 17, Public Face of a Rare Illness, Is Dead


Sam's life with progeria, a genetic disorder resulting in rapid premature aging, was the subject of a documentary film shortlisted for an Academy Award.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-16:14:6:10




Guinea Worm Cases Drop by More Than 70%


Only 148 cases of Guinea worm disease, which is on the brink of extinction, were found in the world in 2013, the Carter Center announced Thursday.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-16:14:6:9




The gene doping battle


Could this be sport's biggest battle yet?

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:8




DNA found in 1930 murder mystery


DNA could identify unknown victim in 1930s murder

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:7




Why criminal twins may no longer be safe


Can DNA help when a crime is committed by identical twins?

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:6




China cloning on 'industrial scale'


China pioneers the mass production of cloned pigs

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:5




Lions 'facing extinction in West Africa'


There has been a catastrophic collapse in the number of lions in West Africa, with only around 400 left in the region, a new survey suggests.

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:4




Iconic fossil's rear parts described


Scientists finally get to describe the back end of a key fossil illustrating the transition of animal life from water to land.

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:3




Science enters $1,000 genome era


The ability to sequence a human genome for just $1,000 has arrived, a US genetic technology company has announced.

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:2




Sight restored to partially blind man


Surgeons in Oxford improve the vision of six patients who would otherwise have become blind using a gene therapy technique.

From the BBC News-2014-1-16:14:6:1




Aiming to Push Genomics Forward in New Study


Regeneron Pharmaceuticals will sequence DNA from about 100,000 patients of Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania, seeking genetic variants linked to diseases that may provide clues to developing new drugs.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-13:8:5:1




Matter: A Living Time Capsule Shows the Human Mark on Evolution


The resurrection of animals centuries old provides a look at how humans have affected the way wild species adapt.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-9:8:5:2




Fish oil extracted from plant seeds


Scientists have genetically engineered plant seeds to contain Omega-3 fish oils and have incorporated the oils into salmon feed.

From the BBC News-2014-1-9:8:5:1




Fluorescence Is Widespread in Fish, Study Finds


The findings, that at least 180 species and 16 orders of fish are biofluorescent, have implications for their evolution and behavior.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-8:20:6:1




Observatory: Mutant Petunias Sing the Blues


What makes some petunias blue? Researchers have discovered a genetic glitch that produces the different shade, and weakens the plants.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-6:14:6:1




How journals like Nature, Cell and Science are damaging science


The incentives offered by top journals distort science, just as bigbonuses distort banking

From The Guardian News-2014-1-6:9:42:1




Bracing for Carp in Great Lakes, but Debating Their Presence


Asian carp, or carp DNA at least, may have arrived in the Great Lakes, and either way, the Army Corps of Engineers will issue a study proposing ways to keep the invasive species out.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-5:8:5:2




A Lonely Quest for Facts on Genetically Modified Crops


When a bill to ban genetically engineered crops on the island of Hawaii was introduced, doubts nagged at Greggor Ilagan, a councilman, about what the risks were, if any, of the crops.

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-5:8:5:1




'Narrow escape' for storm fossil


A near-complete ichthyosaur skeleton discovered on the Dorset coast after Christmas storms was hours away from destruction, fossil hunters say.

From the BBC News-2014-1-4:8:5:1




Dot Earth Blog: Food, Genes and the Feeling of Risk


A writer focused on sustainable eating gives a mostly clean bill of health to GMO's. So what?

From the NYTimes News-2014-1-3:14:6:1




Viewpoint: Human evolution, from tree to braid


Finds from 2013 show that the branching tree of human evolution is turning into a weave of interlaced lineages.

From the BBC News-2013-12-31:8:5:1




The Week: Unsettling News on Knee Surgery, and a Striking Neanderthal Gene


A common orthopedic surgery may be no more effective than fake operations for people with a certain injury, and Type 2 diabetes may be linked to a gene dating to Neanderthals.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-30:20:6:1




I Had My DNA Picture Taken, With Varying Results


A healthy 28-year-old had three different companies check her genetic code. The discrepancies in their results were striking.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-30:14:6:3




New genetic clues for arthritis


An international team of researchers have found more than 40 new areas in DNA that increase the risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

From the BBC News-2013-12-30:14:6:2




Diabetes risk 'from Neanderthals'


A gene variant that seems to increase the risk of diabetes in Latin Americans appears to have been picked up from Neanderthals, a study suggests.

From the BBC News-2013-12-30:14:6:1




Janet D. Rowley, Who Discovered That Cancer Can Be Genetic, Dies at 88


In 1972, Dr. Rowley became the first person to show a conclusive link between certain genetic abnormalities and certain cancers.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-21:8:5:1




Cynthia Russett, Historian of Women, Dies at 76


Professor Russett's best-known book, "Sexual Science," published in 1989, explored attempts by Victorian thinkers, including Darwin, to scientifically "prove" women's inferiority.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-19:8:5:1




Mystery early human revealed in DNA


DNA analysis of early human remains from a Siberian cave has revealed the existence of a mystery human species.

From the BBC News-2013-12-18:14:6:1




Matter: Toe Fossil Provides Complete Neanderthal Genome


Scientists say the accuracy of the new genome is of similar quality to sequencing the DNA of a living person.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-18:14:6:2




Old bone dates human hand evolution


The discovery of an ancient bone at a burial site in Kenya puts the origin of human hand dexterity more than half a million years earlier than previously thought.

From the BBC News-2013-12-17:8:5:1




Grades 'more nature than nurture'


Genetic influence explains almost 60% of the variation in GCSE exam results, twin studies suggest.

From the BBC News-2013-12-12:8:5:1




The Week: An Evolutionary Twist and a New Role for Drones


A 400,000-year-old femur recovered in Spain shows that human evolution was more complex than previously thought, and a scientific panel warned of rapid, catastrophic effects of global warming.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-9:20:6:1




Saudi human genome project launched


Up to 100,000 people in Saudi Arabia are to have their genetic codes mapped by 2017.

From the BBC News-2013-12-9:14:6:1




Gene-testing company 'here to stay'


Personal-genetics company 23andMe says it is "not going anywhere", after the Food and Drug Administration ordered it to stop marketing-spit testing kits.

From the BBC News-2013-12-9:8:5:1




VIDEO: Ancient DNA find is 'very exciting'


Prof Chris Stringer from the Natural History Museum, London, explains what the discovery of 400,000 year-old human DNA could tell us about human evolution.

From the BBC News-2013-12-4:20:6:1




Matter: At 400,000 Years, Oldest Human DNA Yet Found Raises New Mysteries


DNA from a fossil in Spain most closely matches another extinct human lineage, Denisovans, whose remains have been found thousands of miles away in Siberia.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-4:14:6:2




Leg bone gives up oldest human DNA


The retrieval of high quality DNA from a 400,000-year-old human has opened up a new frontier in the study of our ancient ancestors.

From the BBC News-2013-12-4:14:6:1




US gene testing firm halts marketing


Genetic testing firm 23andMe, which is backed by Google, stops marketing its products after a warning from US regulators, a spokeswoman says.

From the BBC News-2013-12-3:20:6:1




Genetic Connections: Learning to Defuse the Aorta


The long search for a gene mutation has led to a chance of stopping Marfan syndrome and reducing the risk of a fatal burst before it happens.

From the NYTimes News-2013-12-2:20:6:1




'Memories' pass between generations


Behaviour can be affected by events in previous generations which have been passed on through a form of genetic memory, animal studies suggest.

From the BBC News-2013-12-1:20:6:1




VIDEO: 'Richest human fossil site' found


Archaeologists in South Africa have unearthed what could be the richest fossil site in Africa.

From the BBC News-2013-11-28:20:6:1




Persistence in the Genes: Connecting the Dots to the Mayflower


A New York organization has rigorous rules for applicants to be recognized as a descendant of one of the 102 settlers who made the voyage in 1620 to Plymouth, Mass.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-28:20:6:2




Matter: Linking Genes to Diseases by Sifting Through Electronic Medical Records


In so-called phenome-wide association studies, scientists start with a gene variant and search thousands of medical conditions for a match.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-28:14:6:2




Giant prehistoric toilet unearthed


A massive "communal latrine" full of thousands of fossilised poos offers a time capsule to the dawn of the dinosaurs, scientists say.

From the BBC News-2013-11-28:14:6:1




The Cancer Divide: In Israel, a Push to Screen for Cancer Gene Leaves Many Conflicted


As a push ensues in Israel to test for cancer-causing gene mutations that are common among many Jews, women are facing hard choices about how much they want to know.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-27:8:5:1




F.D.A. Orders Genetic Testing Firm to Stop Selling DNA Analysis Service


The Food and Drug Administration sent a warning letter to 23andme, which sells a $99 personal genome testing kit, saying the company had not proved that the product worked.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-26:20:6:2




VIDEO: For sale: 150 million-year-old dinosaur


The almost complete fossil of a diplodocus is set to go under the hammer at an auction in the UK on Wednesday.

From the BBC News-2013-11-26:20:6:1




Texas Education Board Flags Biology Textbook Over Evolution Concerns


The State Board of Education delayed final approval of a widely used biology textbook because of concerns raised by one reviewer that the book presents evolution as fact rather than mere theory.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-23:8:5:1




Male Y chromosome 'could be scrapped'


Scientists have practically obliterated the ultimate symbol of maleness in DNA, the Y chromosome, and believe they may be able to do away with it completely.

From the BBC News-2013-11-22:8:5:2




Fresh effort to clone extinct animal


Scientists in Spain have received funding to test whether an extinct mountain goat can be cloned from preserved cells.

From the BBC News-2013-11-22:8:5:1




Frederick Sanger, 95, Two-Time Winner of Nobel and Pioneer in Genetics, Dies


Dr. Sanger, a British biochemist, showed how amino acids link together to form insulin in 1958, and invented a method of "reading" molecular letters that make up the genetic code in 1980.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-21:8:5:1




Darwin's frogs face fungal assault


The fungus that is decimating amphibians worldwide has claimed one species of Darwin's frog and may soon claim the other, scientists say.

From the BBC News-2013-11-20:20:6:1




Two Surprises in Ancient DNA of Boy Found Buried in Siberia


The genome of a Mal'ta boy indicates that Europeans reached farther east across Eurasia than previously assumed, and that Native Americans may be descended from a mix of Western Europeans and East Asians.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-20:14:6:2




Frederick Sanger, Two-Time Nobel-Winning Scientist, Dies at 95


Dr. Sanger, a British biochemist, showed how amino acids link together to form insulin in 1958, and invented a method of "reading" molecular letters that make up the genetic code in 1980.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-20:14:6:3




Ancient DNA links Europe to America


The genome of a boy who died in central Siberia 24,000 years ago sheds light on the origins of Native Americans.

From the BBC News-2013-11-20:14:6:1




Company bids to trial GM insects


UK company awaits a decision on its application to carry out the first European field trial of a genetically modified insect.

From the BBC News-2013-11-20:8:5:1




VIDEO: How to rear genetically modified flies


Researcher Martha Koukidou from Oxitec explains how to rear GM fruit flies in preparation for the first European field trial of the insects.

From the BBC News-2013-11-20:8:5:2




Who buys a diplodocus?


Who buys a 17m-long diplodocus dino fossil?

From the BBC News-2013-11-19:14:6:1




Coldblooded Does Not Mean Stupid


Recent research revealing that their brains are less primitive than previously thought could offer new insights on cognitive evolution.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-18:20:6:1




Observatory: Clues to the Origins of Big Cats


A new set of fossils, ranging from four million to six million years old, and thought to be the oldest ever found, belonged to a previously unknown species.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-18:20:6:2




Developing a Fax Machine to Copy Life on Mars


DNA sequencing and DNA synthesis are becoming faster and cheaper, and J. Craig Venter wants to use the technology to bring Martian life to Earth.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-18:8:5:1




In a Bean, a Boon to Biotech


A policy proposed by the Food and Drug Administration could make marketing genetically modified soybeans easier.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-16:8:5:1




Probe May Help Solve Riddle of Mars's Missing Air


Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution, or Maven for short, is to spend at least a year observing the Martian atmosphere.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-15:20:6:1




VIDEO: 'Duelling dinosaurs' for auction


Two dinosaurs thought to have been locked in combat when they died are to be auctioned in New York next week.

From the BBC News-2013-11-15:14:6:1




DNA hint of European origin for dogs


The results of a DNA study suggest that dogs were domesticated in Europe.

From the BBC News-2013-11-14:20:6:1




Oldest big cat fossil found in Tibet


The skull of a four million-year-old big cat resembling a modern snow leopard has been found in the Himalayas, evidence that big cats first evolved in Asia not Africa.

From the BBC News-2013-11-12:20:6:1




Observatory: Single Tooth Tells of Long-Extinct Platypus


Scientists have identified an ancient species of platypus, its diet and habitat, all from the discovery of a single fossil tooth.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-11:20:6:1




Leonard Herzenberg, Immunologist Who Revolutionized Research, Dies at 81


Dr. Herzenberg, who developed a device to better examine cells, helped facilitate stem cell research and advance the treatment of cancer and other illnesses.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-11:8:5:1




Matter: High Above Sea Level, Evolutionary Hot Spots


The remarkable ecosystems known as Páramos are home to the fastest evolution on Earth, a new study suggests.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-7:14:6:1




Massive DNA volunteer hunt begins


Scientists are looking for 100,000 volunteers prepared to have their DNA sequenced and published online for anyone to look at.

From the BBC News-2013-11-7:8:5:2




Statue honours evolution pioneer


The 100th anniversary of the death of Alfred Russel Wallace, the "forgotten hero" who co-discovered evolution, is marked by a statue and a new wasp.

From the BBC News-2013-11-7:8:5:1




Case of Insect Interruptus Yields a Rare Fossil Find


Researchers say the oldest fossil of two insects copulating - in this case, froghoppers killed in a volcanic eruption 165 million years ago - was identified in what is now Northeastern China.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-6:20:6:1




'King of gore' dinosaur discovered


A new super-predator dinosaur that roamed the earth 80 million years ago is discovered in southern Utah.

From the BBC News-2013-11-6:14:6:1




Dot Earth Blog: Wide Rejection of Labels for Genetically Engineered Food in Washington State


A measure that would require labeling of genetically modified foods is rejected in Washington State.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-6:14:6:2




Books: 'Bootstrap Geologist' Sets Aside Convention for Curiosity


In his autobiography, Gene Shinn recounts his life and research, driven among other things by a boundless curiosity and a sure hand at underwater demolition.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-4:20:6:2




'Platypus-zilla' found in Australia


Part of a giant platypus fossil, dubbed platypus-zilla, is unearthed in Australia, scientists report.

From the BBC News-2013-11-4:20:6:1




Herbal Supplements Are Often Not What They Seem


A study using DNA testing offers perhaps the most credible evidence to date of adulteration, contamination and mislabeling in the herbal supplement industry.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-3:20:6:1




Dot Earth Blog: A Risk Communicator Says Industry Should Embrace Labeling of Genetically Modified Foods


A longtime risk communicator says industry should drop its fierce opposition to GMO labels.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-1:14:6:1




Bill Limiting Pesticide Use on Hawaii Island Is Vetoed


The legislation, vetoed by the mayor on the ground that it was flawed, was aimed at seed companies developing genetically modified crops on the island of Kauai.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-1:8:5:1




Poland, Wedded to Coal, Spurns Europe on Clean Energy Targets


A fossil-fuels holdout, Poland has actively worked to block the European Union's effort to more tightly control greenhouse gas emissions.

From the NYTimes News-2013-11-1:8:5:2




Japan sea species 'face extinction'


Japanese hunting of dolphins, smaller whales and porpoises is threatening some species with extinction, an environmental group says.

From the BBC News-2013-10-31:14:6:1




VIDEO: Building a digital robot dinosaur


Dr Bill Sellers from the University of Manchester explains how he created a "digital robot sauropod" to solve the mystery of how these giants moved around.

From the BBC News-2013-10-31:8:5:1




VIDEO: Nasa gears up for mission to Mars


US space agency Nasa is preparing to launch its Mars Atmosphere and Volatile Evolution (Maven) spacecraft next month to probe the atmosphere on the Red Planet.

From the BBC News-2013-10-29:8:5:1




Alzheimer's insight from DNA study


A clearer picture of what causes Alzheimer's disease is emerging after the largest ever analysis of patient's DNA.

From the BBC News-2013-10-28:8:5:1




Dino impact 'also decimated bees'


Scientists say there was a widespread extinction of bees 66 million years ago, at the same time as the event that killed off the dinosaurs.

From the BBC News-2013-10-25:14:6:1




Light shed on how genes shape face


Scientists identify thousands of small regions of DNA that influence the way facial features develop.

From the BBC News-2013-10-24:14:6:1




Plundering Science, Bone by Bone


Fossil poachers have become a major problem for paleontologists, wreaking havoc on the sites of dinosaur remains.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-21:20:6:1




What's That Smell? Exotic Scents Made From Re-engineered Yeast


Genetic engineering to produce products that now come from rare plants holds great promise, but critics warn of harm to small farmers, among others.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-21:8:5:1




VIDEO: Georgian skull discovery explained


A 90-second explanation of the primitive human skull discovery in Georgia, that is leading scientists to question the path of human evolution.

From the BBC News-2013-10-18:20:6:1




Skull Fossil Suggests Simpler Human Lineage


An analysis of a 1.8-million-year-old skull suggests that early human ancestors may have been members of the same species, with diverse physical appearances.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-17:20:6:1




Matter: Key to Ants' Evolution May Have Started With a Wasp


A recently published evolutionary tree of ants and their closest relatives may provide answers to how ants evolved and spread to most corners of the earth.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-17:14:6:1




Limits Approved for Genetically Modified Crops in Kauai, Hawaii


The ordinance requires seed companies to disclose which pesticides they use and establishes some no-spray zones.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-17:8:5:2




VIDEO: 'Yeti hairs identical to polar bear'


A human genetics expert who has analysed hairs allegedly from Yetis, says they are genetically identical to ancient polar bears.

From the BBC News-2013-10-17:8:5:1




Clawed fossil had spider-like brain


A clawed spider-like creature reveals the most intact nervous system ever observed in an ancient fossil, 520 million years old.

From the BBC News-2013-10-16:14:6:1




Books: 'The Compatibility Gene' Offers Insights to Immunology


Daniel M. Davis writes with an insider's perspective, not only on how our immune systems do and don't work, but on the scientists who study them.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-14:20:6:2




A Rare Open House Lets Visitors in the Herbarium at Kew Gardens


A rare open house in London allows visitors a peek into the Herbarium at Kew Gardens, a vast collection of plant specimens and other treasures, some from Darwin and Livingstone, others more recent.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-14:20:6:1




AUDIO: Is it 'wicked' to oppose GM crops?


The Environment Secretary claims that groups opposing a type of genetically modified rice are "wicked" - but is he right?

From the BBC News-2013-10-14:14:6:1




GM 'golden rice' opponents 'wicked'


Opponents to the development of a type of genetically modified rice enriched with vitamin A are criticised as "wicked" by the environment secretary.

From the BBC News-2013-10-14:8:5:1




[Herbal product contamination 'considerable,' DNA tests find>


A DNA test of herbal products has found that most of them contained cheaper fillers and plant ingredients not listed on the label, some of which pose "serious health risks."

From the CBC News-2013-10-11:14:6:2




European origins laid bare by DNA


DNA from ancient skeletons has revealed how a complex patchwork of prehistoric migrations fashioned the modern European gene pool.

From the BBC News-2013-10-10:20:6:1




European link to Jewish ancestry


A new genetics study challenges some previous theories on the maternal ancestry of Ashkenazi Jews.

From the BBC News-2013-10-9:8:5:1




Genes Suggest European Women at Root of Ashkenazi Family Tree


A genetic analysis indicates that the women who founded the Ashkenazi Jewish community of Europe were not from the Near East, as previously thought.

From the NYTimes News-2013-10-8:14:6:1




'Digital baby' screen for sperm donors


A service that digitally weaves together the DNA of prospective parents to check for potential disease in thousands of "virtual babies" is set to launch in the US by December.

From the BBC News-2013-10-4:8:5:1




[Massive dinosaur fossil unearthed by Alberta pipeline crew>


A massive dinosaur fossil has been found by a pipeline inspection crew near Spirit River, Alta.

From the CBC News-2013-10-3:14:6:1




A Wealth of Data in Whale Breath


Researchers are learning how to use the breath, or "blow," of whales and dolphins to extract and measure hormones, microorganisms, DNA and the byproducts of metabolism.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-30:20:6:2




The Week: Looking for Lincoln, and an Early Fish Fossil


Recent developments in health and science news. This week: A substitute for silicon in computer chips and a United Nations warning on carbon emissions.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-30:20:6:1




DNA review call in Kercher retrial


Defence lawyers want forensic evidence to be re-examined in the retrial of Amanda Knox and Raffaele Sollecito over the 2007 murder of Briton Meredith Kercher.

From the BBC News-2013-9-30:14:6:1




Creationists on Texas Panel for Biology Textbooks


The panel reviewing publishers' submissions has stirred controversy because some of its members do not accept evolution and climate change as scientific truth.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-29:8:5:1




'Jaw-dropping' fish fossil discovery


A leading British scientist describes the discovery of a 419-million-year-old fish fossil in China as a stunning and spectacular development.

From the BBC News-2013-9-27:14:6:1





An international team of scientists in China has discovered what may be the earliest known creature with a distinct face, a 419 million-year-old fish that could be a missing link in the development of vertebrates.

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From the CBC News-2013-9-26:14:6:1




Court rejects DNA sample challenge


An ex-prisoner loses a legal challenge at the High Court against a request by police for him to provide DNA samples.

From the BBC News-2013-9-24:8:5:1




Biology: Decoy Protein Boosts Bone Growth


Mice with dwarfism characteristics, caused by a gene mutation, resumed normal bone growth after injection of a decoy protein.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-23:20:6:2




Gene Therapy With a Difference


An experimental drug for Duchenne muscular dystrophy failed in a large clinical trial recently, but the technique of counteracting mutated genes holds promise.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-23:20:6:3




Genetics: Research May Point to Treatment for Cold Sores


Insight about a mutated gene in people who got cold sores suggests a possible research route for both cold sores and other infections caused by herpes simplex virus type 1.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-23:20:6:1




Scientists map UK ash tree genome


Scientists have mapped the genome of the native ash tree, in research to find a way to protect woodlands from a deadly fungus.

From the BBC News-2013-9-22:20:6:1




Spiny rat discovered in Indonesia


A new genus of rodent is found in the remote forests of Indonesia's Moluccas islands, where Wallace developed his theory of evolution.

From the BBC News-2013-9-20:8:5:1




Matter: New Approach to Explaining Evolution's Big Bang


Two scientists take a fresh look at the hypotheses about the Cambrian explosion, one of the most important phases in the history of life.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-19:20:6:1




Genomes of big cats revealed


International scientists have mapped the genomes of the tiger, lion and snow leopard, in conservation efforts to protect endangered species.

From the BBC News-2013-9-17:14:6:1




Dot Earth Blog: How to Survive a Mass Extinction – Even One Caused by Us


Handy tips for surviving the next mass extinction - even if it's our own doing.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-17:14:6:2




Health kick 'reverses cell ageing'


Going on a health kick reverses ageing at the cellular level, claim US researchers who have been studying people's DNA.

From the BBC News-2013-9-17:8:5:1




DNA Double Take


Your DNA and identity are not as entwined as once thought. In fact most people have multiple genomes floating around, from mutations and remnants of pregnancies or twins.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-16:20:6:1




Science 'could lose' duelling dinos


Rare dino fossils could be lost to science

From the BBC News-2013-9-11:14:6:1




'Climate change' killed off mammoths


Researchers have found the strongest evidence yet that climate change rather than humans was the main factor that drove the woolly mammoth to extinction.

From the BBC News-2013-9-11:8:5:1




Observatory: Male Sensitivity Written in the Genes


A crucial gene on the Y chromosome, SRY, that activates male development in a human embryo is surprisingly sensitive and vulnerable to environmental factors, a study finds.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-9:20:6:1




Rare ape cranium fossil uncovered in China


Researchers have uncovered a rare fossil – the cranium of a young ape from a site in Yunnan province, China that dates back some 23 to 5 million years ago.

From the CBC News-2013-9-6:14:6:2




Observatory: Hyperactivity Linked to Inner Ear Defect


A new study says a genetic defect may play a role in causing hyperactive behavior, suggesting that at least in some cases, hyperactivity can have a neurobiological root.

From the NYTimes News-2013-9-6:14:6:1




Pioneering heart attack gene therapy study starts in Ottawa


The first patient has been treated in a groundbreaking medical trial in Ottawa that could lead to a new way to repair damaged tissues following a heart attack.

From the CBC News-2013-9-5:14:6:1




Light-colour whales 'tan' for sun protection, study finds


Scientists have found that higher melanin levels in a whale's skin correlated with lower levels of skin lesions and DNA damage, suggesting melanin protects them from sun damage.

From the CBC News-2013-8-30:14:6:1




Exhibition Review: 'Genome: Unlocking Life's Code,' at the Smithsonian


An exhibition at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History gives a sense of the Human Genome Project and provides glimpses of its promises and limitations.

From the NYTimes News-2013-8-30:8:5:1




B.C. duck-billed dinosaur find airlifted to new home


It took several years to coordinate, but B.C.'s most complete dinosaur skeleton has a new home. The bones were recently air-lifted from a dig site near the Alberta border to a museum in northeastern B.C.

From the CBC News-2013-8-29:14:6:1