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Current Issue of Nature


Current Issue : Nature

Current Issue

Volume 555 Number 7694 pp5-126

1 March 2018

About the cover

Programmes aimed at meeting the UN's Sustainable Development Goals need to be informed by data. In two papers in this week's issue, Simon Hay and his colleagues present high-resolution geospatial maps that offer a detailed view of two key components of human capital from 51 African nations: child growth failure and educational inequality. Using survey and census data from thousands of villages across the continent, the authors gathered information on adult educational attainment, and child age, height and weight. They then used Bayesian modelling to combine these data with factors such as local geography and climate in order to extrapolate to regions where information was lacking. The result is a series of maps that show changes in educational attainment and child growth failure between 2000 and 2015 at a resolution of 5 km x 5 km. Although nearly every nation showed certain regions of improvement, the authors conclude that there is not a single country on the continent on track to meet the sustainable development goal of ending all malnutrition by 2030, and that gender inequality in education persists in many regions. Cover image: Jasiek Krzysztofiak/Nature

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  • Mapping child growth failure in Africa between 2000 and 2015Open

    • Aaron Osgood-Zimmerman
    • Anoushka I. Millear
    • Rebecca W. Stubbs
    • Chloe Shields
    • Brandon V. Pickering
    • Lucas Earl
    • Nicholas Graetz
    • Damaris K. Kinyoki
    • Sarah E. Ray
    • Samir Bhatt
    • Annie J. Browne
    • Roy Burstein
    • Ewan Cameron
    • Daniel C. Casey
    • Aniruddha Deshpande
    • Nancy Fullman
    • Peter W. Gething
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    • Mario Herrero
    • L. Kendall Krause
    • Ian D. Letourneau
    • Aubrey J. Levine
    • Patrick Y. Liu
    • Joshua Longbottom
    • Benjamin K. Mayala
    • Jonathan F. Mosser
    • Abdisalan M. Noor
    • David M. Pigott
    • Ellen G. Piwoz
    • Puja Rao
    • Rahul Rawat
    • Robert C. Reiner
    • David L. Smith
    • Daniel J. Weiss
    • Kirsten E. Wiens
    • Ali H. Mokdad
    • Stephen S. Lim
    • Christopher J. L. Murray
    • Nicholas J. Kassebaum
    • Simon I. Hay

    Geospatial estimates of child growth failure in Africa provide a baseline for measuring progress and a precision public health platform to target interventions to those populations with the greatest need.

    See also
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  • Mapping local variation in educational attainment across AfricaOpen

    • Nicholas Graetz
    • Joseph Friedman
    • Aaron Osgood-Zimmerman
    • Roy Burstein
    • Molly H. Biehl
    • Chloe Shields
    • Jonathan F. Mosser
    • Daniel C. Casey
    • Aniruddha Deshpande
    • Lucas Earl
    • Robert C. Reiner
    • Sarah E. Ray
    • Nancy Fullman
    • Aubrey J. Levine
    • Rebecca W. Stubbs
    • Benjamin K. Mayala
    • Joshua Longbottom
    • Annie J. Browne
    • Samir Bhatt
    • Daniel J. Weiss
    • Peter W. Gething
    • Ali H. Mokdad
    • Stephen S. Lim
    • Christopher J. L. Murray
    • Emmanuela Gakidou
    • Simon I. Hay

    Local-level analyses show that, despite marked progress in educational attainment from 2000 to 2015 across Africa, substantial differences persist between locations and sexes that have widened in many countries.

    See also
    See also
  • Population snapshots predict early haematopoietic and erythroid hierarchies

    • Betsabeh Khoramian Tusi
    • Samuel L. Wolock
    • Caleb Weinreb
    • Yung Hwang
    • Daniel Hidalgo
    • Rapolas Zilionis
    • Ari Waisman
    • Jun R. Huh
    • Allon M. Klein
    • Merav Socolovsky

    Single-cell transcriptomics, fate assays and a computational theory enable prediction of cell fates during haematopoiesis, discovery of regulators of erythropoiesis and reveal coupling between the erythroid, basophil and mast cell fates.

  • Extreme disorder in an ultrahigh-affinity protein complex

    • Alessandro Borgia
    • Madeleine B. Borgia
    • Katrine Bugge
    • Vera M. Kissling
    • Pétur O. Heidarsson
    • Catarina B. Fernandes
    • Andrea Sottini
    • Andrea Soranno
    • Karin J. Buholzer
    • Daniel Nettels
    • Birthe B. Kragelund
    • Robert B. Best
    • Benjamin Schuler

    A high-affinity complex of histone H1 and prothymosin-α reveals an unexpected interaction mechanism, where the large opposite net charge enables the two proteins to remain highly disordered even in the complex.

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