This page is brought to you by Brian Golding (Golding@McMaster.CA) and is copied locally here to speed your access. To go to the original page (should you find something interesting or should you wish to follow links) click on

Current Issue of Nature


Volume 606 Issue 7916, 30 June 2022
Skip to main content

Thank you for visiting nature.com. You are using a browser version with limited support for CSS. To obtain the best experience, we recommend you use a more up to date browser (or turn off compatibility mode in Internet Explorer). In the meantime, to ensure continued support, we are displaying the site without styles and JavaScript.

Volume 606 Issue 7916, 30 June 2022

Order out of chaos

The cover shows an artistic representation of various cancer cells. The large-scale gains, losses and rearrangements of DNA seen in chromosomal instability are a typical feature of cancer — but there is no comprehensive framework to decode the causes of this genomic variability and their possible links to disease. In this week’s issue, Florian Markowetz, Geoff Macintyre and their colleagues present such a framework with a compendium of 17 signatures of chromosomal instability that can be used to predict how tumours might respond to drugs and that help to identify future therapeutic targets. The team created the compendium by examining 7,880 tumours representing 33 types of cancer. In a separate paper, Nischalan Pillay and colleagues examined 9,873 cancers to generate 21 similar signatures of chromosomal instability.

Cover image: Julian Aubrey Smith

This Week

Top of page ⤴

News in Focus

Top of page ⤴

Books & Arts

Top of page ⤴

Opinion

Top of page ⤴

Work

Top of page ⤴

Research

  • News & Views

    • A simple method for incorporating molecules into the gaps of stacked semimetallic materials through immersion offers an efficient way of filtering electrons, which could be useful for information-storage technologies.

      • Xi Ling
      News & Views
    • How a bacterium coordinates the assembly of its outer layers, and couples the formation of this envelope to cell growth and division, is not fully understood. Assessing the role of peptidoglycan molecules provides some answers.

      • Michaël Deghelt
      • Jean-François Collet
      News & Views
    • Synthetic receptor proteins can enable customized and flexible control of immune cells called T lymphocytes. A defined framework for the proteins’ design now improves their potential for use in cancer immunotherapy.

      • Mohamad Hamieh
      • Maria Themeli
      News & Views
    • A compound made by plants used in traditional medicine has been prepared by chemical synthesis, providing enough for biological testing. The unexpected finding that it acts at opioid receptors raises prospects for drug discovery.

      • Nicholas P. R. Onuska
      • Joshua G. Pierce
      News & Views
  • Articles

Top of page ⤴

Spotlight

  • Large disease data sets are helping scientists in China and beyond to identify molecular patterns for particular conditions.

    Spotlight
Top of page ⤴
Nature Briefing

Sign up for the Nature Briefing newsletter — what matters in science, free to your inbox daily.

Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing

Search

Quick links