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Current Issue of Trends Ecology Evolution


Issue: Trends in Ecology & Evolution
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Trends in Ecology & Evolution
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Aug 01, 2022

Volume 37Issue 8p625-724, e1-e2
By acting as barriers to gene flow, chromosomal rearrangementstrigger speciation. While the underlying theory was developed for chromosomes with centromeres, holocentric chromosomes that lack centromeres have repeatedly evolved in major clades, such as in sedge family Cyperaceae. A representative of this family, Carex borbonica, is shown here. On pages 655–662, Kay Lucek, Hannah Augustijnen, and Marcial Escudero argue that holocentricity may help to overcome problems associated with classic chromosomal speciation theory and provide new insights into the effects of chromosomal rearrangements on speciation rates. Photo: Modesto Luceño....
By acting as barriers to gene flow, chromosomal rearrangementstrigger speciation. While the underlying theory was developed for chromosomes with centromeres, holocentric chromosomes that lack centromeres have repeatedly evolved in major clades, such as in sedge family Cyperaceae. A representative of this family, Carex borbonica, is shown here. On pages 655–662, Kay Lucek, Hannah Augustijnen, and Marcial Escudero argue that holocentricity may help to overcome problems associated with classic chromosomal speciation theory and provide new insights into the effects of chromosomal rearrangements on speciation rates. Photo: Modesto Luceño.

Letters

  • What is conservation geography?

    • José Maria Cardoso da Silva,
    • Otávio Bueno
    Di Minin et al. [1] introduced quantitative conservation geography as a subfield of conservation science that ‘studies where, when, and what conservation actions should be implemented to mitigate biodiversity threats and support sustainable people–nature interactions.’ Here, we present a concern about the scope of the new subfield and propose a solution that hopefully describes better the interaction between conservation and geography and the rich research agenda outlined by Di Minin et al. [1].
  • Advancing conservation geography

    • Enrico Di Minin,
    • Ricardo A. Correia,
    • Tuuli Toivonen
    In our recent Opinion [1], we called for better recognition of the contributions of quantitative geography in conservation science. In this light, we are pleased that da Silva and Bueno [2] have engaged in discussion with our ideas. da Silva and Bueno [2] echo the exciting prospect of establishing and developing a research area dedicated to conservation geography but also raise relevant questions in response to our Opinion. Their main argumentation relates to the potential overlap between quantitative conservation geography and conservation biogeography and to the inclusion of mixed and qualitative methods to broaden the scope of conservation geography.

Forum

  • 3D animal camouflage

    • Jennifer L. Kelley,
    • Laura A. Kelley,
    • David R. Badcock
    Camouflage is a fundamental way for animals to avoid detection and recognition. While depth information is critical for object detection and recognition, little is known about how camouflage patterns might interfere with the mechanisms of depth perception. We reveal how many common camouflage strategies could exploit 3D visual processing mechanisms.
  • Understanding hunter–gatherer cultural evolution needs network thinking

    • Javier Fernández-López de Pablo,
    • Valéria Romano,
    • Maxime Derex,
    • Erik Gjesfjeld,
    • Claudine Gravel-Miguel,
    • Marcus J. Hamilton,
    • Andrea Bamberg Migliano,
    • Felix Riede,
    • Sergi Lozano
    Open Access
    Hunter–gatherers past and present live in complex societies, and the structure of these can be assessed using social networks. We outline how the integration of new evidence from cultural evolution experiments, computer simulations, ethnography, and archaeology open new research horizons to understand the role of social networks in cultural evolution.

Opinions

  • Feedbacks in ecology and evolution

    • Juli G. Pausas,
    • William J. Bond
    Ecology and evolutionary biology have focused on how organisms fit the environment. Less attention has been given to the idea that organisms can also modify their environment, and that these modifications can feed back to the organism, thus providing a key factor for their persistence and evolution. There are at least three independent lines of evidence emphasizing these biological feedback processes at different scales: niche construction (population scale); alternative biome states (community scale); and the Gaia hypothesis (planetary scale).
  • Struggle for phosphorus and the Devonian overturn

    • Petr Kraft,
    • Michal Mergl
    Organisms with external phosphatic shells diversified and became abundant at the beginning of the Early Paleozoic but gradually declined and were rare by its end. The decreasing availability of phosphorus in oceans is thought to be responsible for this evolutionary trend. Responses of organisms to changes in the phosphorus cycle can be traced to the late Neoproterozoic, and likely had a significant role in the Cambrian explosion, the Great Ordovician Biodiversification Event (GOBE), and the Devonian nekton revolution.
  • Featured Article
  • A holocentric twist to chromosomal speciation?

    • Kay Lucek,
    • Hannah Augustijnen,
    • Marcial Escudero
    Chromosomal rearrangements trigger speciation by acting as barriers to gene flow. However, the underlying theory was developed with monocentric chromosomes in mind. Holocentric chromosomes, lacking a centromeric region, have repeatedly evolved and account for a significant fraction of extant biodiversity. Because chromosomal rearrangements may be more likely retained in holocentric species, holocentricity could provide a twist to chromosomal speciation. Here, we discuss how the abundance of chromosome-scale genomes, combined with novel analytical tools, offer the opportunity to assess the impacts of chromosomal rearrangements on rates of speciation by outlining a phylogenetic framework that aligns with the two major lines of chromosomal speciation theory.
  • What is domestication?

    • Michael D. Purugganan
    Open Access
    The nature of domestication is often misunderstood. Most definitions of the process are anthropocentric and center on human intentionality, which minimizes the role of unconscious selection and also excludes non-human domesticators. An overarching, biologically grounded definition of domestication is discussed, which emphasizes its core nature as a coevolutionary process that arises from a specialized mutualism, in which one species controls the fitness of another in order to gain resources and/or services.
  • Unifying climate change biology across realms and taxa

    • Malin L. Pinsky,
    • Lise Comte,
    • Dov F. Sax
    A major challenge in modern biology is to understand extinction risk from climate change across all realms. Recent research has revealed that physiological tolerance, behavioral thermoregulation, and small elevation shifts are dominant coping strategies on land, whereas large-scale latitudinal shifts are more important in the ocean. Freshwater taxa may face the highest global extinction risks. Nevertheless, some species in each realm face similar risks because of shared adaptive, dispersal, or physiological tolerances and abilities.
  • New directions in tropical phenology

    • Charles C. Davis,
    • Goia M. Lyra,
    • Daniel S. Park,
    • Renata Asprino,
    • Rogério Maruyama,
    • Débora Torquato,
    • Benjamin I. Cook,
    • Aaron M. Ellison
    Earth’s most speciose biomes are in the tropics, yet tropical plant phenology remains poorly understood. Tropical phenological data are comparatively scarce and viewed through the lens of a ‘temperate phenological paradigm’ expecting phenological traits to respond to strong, predictably annual shifts in climate (e.g., between subfreezing and frost-free periods). Digitized herbarium data greatly expand existing phenological data for tropical plants; and circular data, statistics, and models are more appropriate for analyzing tropical (and temperate) phenological datasets.

Reviews

  • Strategic growth in social vertebrates

    • Peter Buston,
    • Tim Clutton-Brock
    Individual differences in growth and size of vertebrates often represent adaptive, plastic responses to contrasts in ecological conditions. Recent studies show that vertebrates can also modify their growth and size in an adaptive fashion in response to fine-grain changes in social conditions (which we refer to as strategic growth). Here, we review experimental evidence for strategic growth in social vertebrates. We describe a set of conditions under which strategic growth commonly occurs, and highlight potential examples of convergent evolution of strategic growth across the tree of life.
  • Featured Article
  • The eco-evolutionary landscape of power relationships between males and females

    • Eve Davidian,
    • Martin Surbeck,
    • Dieter Lukas,
    • Peter M. Kappeler,
    • Elise Huchard
    In animal societies, control over resources and reproduction is often biased towards one sex. Yet, the ecological and evolutionary underpinnings of male–female power asymmetries remain poorly understood. We outline a comprehensive framework to quantify and predict the dynamics of male–female power relationships within and across mammalian species. We show that male–female power relationships are more nuanced and flexible than previously acknowledged. We then propose that enhanced reproductive control over when and with whom to mate predicts social empowerment across ecological and evolutionary contexts.

Correction

  • Biological Earth observation with animal sensors

    (Trends in Ecology and Evolution 37, 293–298; 2022)

    • Walter Jetz,
    • Grigori Tertitski,
    • Roland Kays,
    • Uschi Mueller,
    • Martin Wikelski
    • Supporting authors
    Open Access
    Six supporting authors were omitted from the article ‘ Biological Earth observation with animal sensors ´ when it was published. The corrected supporting author list appears below. We apologise for this oversight.
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