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Current Issue of Trends Ecology Evolution


Issue: Trends in Ecology & Evolution

Nov 01, 2021

Volume 36Issue 11p957-1060, e1-e2
Memory of a prior exposure to environmental stress can increase the tolerance of subsequent exposures, which is vital for sessile organisms such as acroporid corals, pictured here. It appears that corals can acquire and maintain enhanced stress tolerance through a dose-dependent environmental memory, which may persist for multiple years. On pages 1011–1023, Serena Hackerott and colleagues discuss potential mechanisms behind this phenomenon and its potential to increase resilience under climate change. Cover image: ©RichardHoward/OceansOfImages.com 2014....
Memory of a prior exposure to environmental stress can increase the tolerance of subsequent exposures, which is vital for sessile organisms such as acroporid corals, pictured here. It appears that corals can acquire and maintain enhanced stress tolerance through a dose-dependent environmental memory, which may persist for multiple years. On pages 1011–1023, Serena Hackerott and colleagues discuss potential mechanisms behind this phenomenon and its potential to increase resilience under climate change. Cover image: ©RichardHoward/OceansOfImages.com 2014.

Scientific Life

  • Equity in science: advocating for a triple-blind review system

    • Stephanie Brodie,
    • André Frainer,
    • Maria Grazia Pennino,
    • Shan Jiang,
    • Laura Kaikkonen,
    • Jon Lopez,
    • Kelly Ortega-Cisneros,
    • Carl A. Peters,
    • Samiya A. Selim,
    • Natașa Văidianu
    We propose 'triple-blind review' for peer-reviewed journals – a process that keeps author identities and affiliations blind to manuscript editors until after first appraisal. Blinded appraisal will help to reduce the biases that negatively affect under-represented and minority scientists, ultimately better supporting equity in scientific publishing.
  • Animal behavior missing from data archives

    • Sara E. Miller,
    • Christopher M. Jernigan,
    • Andrew W. Legan,
    • Caitlin H. Miller,
    • James P. Tumulty,
    • Alexander Walton,
    • Michael J. Sheehan
    An investigation into animal behavior data archiving practices revealed low rates of data archiving, frequent issues with archived data, and a near absence of multimedia data from data archives. Increasing archiving of animal behavior data will improve the integrity of current studies and enable new avenues of research.
  • Belonging in STEM: an interactive, iterative approach to create and maintain a diverse learning community

    • Marina J. Ayala,
    • Javan K. Carter,
    • Avani S. Fachon,
    • Samuel M. Flaxman,
    • Michael A. Gil,
    • Heather V. Kenny,
    • Zachary M. Laubach,
    • Sage A. Madden,
    • Molly T. McDermott,
    • Angela Medina-García,
    • Rebecca J. Safran,
    • Ellen Scherner,
    • Drew R. Schield,
    • Sabela Vasquez-Rey,
    • Julie Volckens
    Diversity is a key driver of scientific innovation, yet fields in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) have struggled to retain diverse communities. Research suggests that fostering a sense of belonging is critical for retaining diversity. We propose an iterative process that aims to improve sense of belonging among laboratory (lab) members through self-reflection and community collective action.

Science & Society

  • Valuing marine restoration beyond the ‘too small and too expensive’

    • Dominic McAfee,
    • Robert Costanza,
    • Sean D. Connell
    Restoration is criticized as ineffectively small scale, a smoke screen against global-scale action. Yet, large-scale solutions arise from small-scale successes, which inject social values and optimism needed for global investment. Human values are central to achieving socio-ecological sustainability; understanding human behavior is now arguably more important than understanding the ecological processes.
  • Genome-edited tree crops: mind the socioeconomic implementation gap

    • Manuel Toledo-Hernández,
    • Tonya Allen Lander,
    • Chen Bao,
    • Kabin Xie,
    • Acheampong Atta-Boateng,
    • Thomas Cherico Wanger
    The discussion about CRISPR/Cas genome editing is focused mostly on technical aspects to improve productivity and climate resilience in major tree crops such as cocoa, coffee, and citrus. We suggest a solution to the largely ignored socioeconomic impacts for farmers, when new genome-edited varieties are introduced from the laboratory to the field.

Letters

  • Metamorphosis in warming oceans: a microbe–larva perspective

    • Hao Song,
    • Tao Zhang,
    • Michael G. Hadfield
    Predicting and ameliorating the impacts of climate change on animal species presents a major concern for biologists. A recent review by Lowe et al. [1] importantly stressed that metamorphosis (a physiological, morphological, and often ecological transition between life stages seen in a variety of animals) is particularly vulnerable to environmental stressors. Focusing on two animal groups, vertebrates and insects, the authors highlighted that increasing temperatures can impact the timing and duration of developmental events, the extent of developmental change, and the energetic costs of development.
  • Thanks to Song et al.

    • Winsor H. Lowe,
    • Thomas E. Martin,
    • David K. Skelly,
    • H. Arthur Woods
    We are very grateful for the letter by Song et al. [1] and happy that our review could serve as a catalyst for their insight. The authors address important topics that were missing or underrepresented in our review of how increasing climate variability may affect metamorphic species [2]. We intended for the concepts in our review to be applicable across taxa and biomes, but our examples did focus on terrestrial and freshwater invertebrates and vertebrates. The importance of metamorphic species in marine environments is undeniable, and bacteria-stimulated metamorphosis increases the complexity of potential climate-mediated effects exponentially.

Opinions

    Featured Article
  • The cold range limit of trees

    • Christian Körner
    At high elevation or latitude, trees reach low-temperature range limits. In attempting an explanation, the range limits of individual tree species (set by freezing tolerance) and the general limit of the life-form tree (set by thermal growth constraints) need to be distinguished. The general cold edge of the fundamental niche of trees is termed the treeline, by definition, the lower edge of the alpine belt, a most important bioclimatological reference line. Trees can be absent from the treeline due to disturbances or biotic interactions.
  • Featured Article
  • Certainty and integration of options in animal movement

    • Hannah J. Williams,
    • Kamran Safi
    Open Access
    Physical energy defines the energy landscape and determines the species-specific cost of movement, thus influencing movement decisions. In unpredictable and dynamic environments, observing the locomotion of others increases individual certainty in the distribution of physical energy to increase movement efficiency. Beyond the physical energy landscape, social sampling increases certainty in all ecological landscapes that influence animal movement (including fear and resource landscapes), and individuals use energy to express each of these.
  • How useful are thermal vulnerability indices?

    • Susana Clusella-Trullas,
    • Raquel A. Garcia,
    • John S. Terblanche,
    • Ary A. Hoffmann
    To forecast climate change impacts across habitats or taxa, thermal vulnerability indices (e.g., safety margins and warming tolerances) are growing in popularity. Here, we present their history, context, formulation, and current applications. We highlight discrepancies in terminology and usage, and we draw attention to key assumptions underpinning the main indices and to their ecological and evolutionary relevance. In the process, we flag biases influencing these indices that are not always evaluated.

Reviews

    Featured Article
  • Coral environmental memory: causes, mechanisms, and consequences for future reefs

    • Serena Hackerott,
    • Harmony A. Martell,
    • Jose M. Eirin-Lopez
    The apparent ability of corals to acquire and maintain enhanced stress tolerance through a dose-dependent environmental memory, which may persist for multiple years, has critical implications for coral reef conservation research. Such responses are variable across coral species and environmental stressors, with primed corals exhibiting a modified response to secondary stress exposures. While the mechanisms underlying coral memory responses are poorly understood, they likely involve both the coral host and microbiome.
  • Recognising the key role of individual recognition in social networks

    • Samin Gokcekus,
    • Josh A. Firth,
    • Charlotte Regan,
    • Ben C. Sheldon
    Many aspects of sociality rely on individuals recognising one another. Understanding how, when, and if individuals recognise others can yield insights into the foundations of social relationships and behaviours. Through synthesising individual recognition research in different sensory and social domains, and doing so across various related social contexts, we propose that a social network perspective can help to uncover how individual recognition may vary across different settings, species, and populations.
  • Shape-shifting: changing animal morphologies as a response to climatic warming

    • Sara Ryding,
    • Marcel Klaassen,
    • Glenn J. Tattersall,
    • Janet L. Gardner,
    • Matthew R.E. Symonds
    Many animal appendages, such as avian beaks and mammalian ears, can be used to dissipate excess body heat. Allen’s rule, wherein animals in warmer climates have larger appendages to facilitate more efficient heat exchange, reflects this. We find that there is widespread evidence of ‘shape-shifting’ (changes in appendage size) in endotherms in response to climate change and its associated climatic warming. We re-examine studies of morphological change over time within a thermoregulatory context, finding evidence that temperature can be a strong predictor of morphological change independently of, or combined with, other environmental changes.
  • Mining museums for historical DNA: advances and challenges in museomics

    • Christopher J. Raxworthy,
    • Brian Tilston Smith
    Open Access
    Historical DNA (hDNA), obtained from museum and herbarium specimens, has yielded spectacular new insights into the history of organisms. This includes documenting historical genetic erosion and extinction, discovering species new to science, resolving evolutionary relationships, investigating epigenetic effects, and determining origins of infectious diseases. However, the development of best-practices in isolating, processing, and analyzing hDNA remain under-explored, due to the substantial diversity of specimen preparation types, tissue sources, archival ages, and collecting histories.
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Trends in Ecology & Evolution